Minority Health Archive

Social Anatomy of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Violence

Sampson, Robert J. and Morenoff, Jeffrey D. and Raudenbush, Stephen (2005) Social Anatomy of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Violence. American Journal of Public Health, 25 (2). pp. 225-232. ISSN 0090-0036

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Abstract

We analyzed key individual, family, and neighborhood factors to assess competing hypotheses regarding racial/ethnic gaps in perpetrating violence. From 1995 to 2002, we collected 3 waves of data on 2974 participants aged 18 to 25 years living in 180 Chicago neighborhoods, augmented by a separate community survey of 8782 Chicago residents. The odds of perpetrating violence were 85% higher for Blacks compared with Whites, whereas Latino-perpetrated violence was 10% lower. Yet the majority of the Black–White gap (over 60%) and the entire Latino–White gap were explained primarily by the marital status of parents, immigrant generation, and dimensions of neighborhood social context. The results imply that generic interventions to improve neighborhood conditions and support families may reduce racial gaps in violence.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: competing hypotheses; racial/ethnic gaps; perpetrating violence; Black–White gap; Latino–White gap; neighborhood social context; neighborhood conditions
Subjects: Health > Public Health > Health Risk Factors
Practice > interventions
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 12 Mar 2008
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2011 09:59
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/954

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