Minority Health Archive

The Racial Segregation of Hospital Care Revisited: Medicare Discharge Patterns and Their Implications

Smith, David B. (1998) The Racial Segregation of Hospital Care Revisited: Medicare Discharge Patterns and Their Implications. American Journal of Public Health, 88 (3). pp. 461-463.

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Abstract

Objectives. This paper measures current patterns of hospital segregation among Medicare beneficiaries. Methods. Data from the fiscal year 1993 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) file, the index of dissimilarity, and a linear regression model are used to test the effects of standard metropolitan area characteristics on hospital segregation. Results. The overall hospital segregation index was 0.529, ranging by state from 0.154 to 0.746. Hospital segregation in 126 standard metropolitan areas was positively related to population size,, hospital density, and residential segregation and negatively related to income inequities and location in the South. Conclusions. Racial segregation remains high and may produce both reporting biases and unequal effects of public policy.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: hospital segregation; Medicare program; racial segregation; Hospital care
Subjects: Health > Health Equity
Health > Policy
Research
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2008
Last Modified: 16 Jul 2011 23:57
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/860

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