Minority Health Archive

Are Racial and Ethnic Minorities Less Willing to Participate in Health Research?

Wendler, David and Kington, Raynard and Madans, Jennifer and Wye, Gretchen Van and Christ-Schmidt, Heidi and Pratt, Laura A. and Brawley, Otis W. and Gross, Cary P. and Emanuel, Ezekiel (2005) Are Racial and Ethnic Minorities Less Willing to Participate in Health Research? PLOS Medicine, 3 (2). pp. 201-210.

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    Abstract

    Background: It is widely claimed that racial and ethnic minorities, especially in the US,are less willing than non-minority individuals to participate in health research. Yet,there is a paucity of empirical data to substantiate this claim. Methods and Findings: We performed a comprehensive literature search to identify all puublished health research studies that report consent rates by race or ethnicity. We found 20 health research studies that reported consent rates by race or ethnicity. These 20 studies reported the enrollment decisions of over 70,000 individuals for a broad range of research,from interviews to drug treatment to surgical trials. Eighteen of the twenty studies were single-site studies conducted exclusively in the US or multi-site studies where the majority of sites (i.e., at least 2/3) were in the US. Of the remaining two studies, the Concorde study was conducted at 74 sites in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and France, while the Delta study was conducted at 152 sites in Europe and 23 sites in Australia and New Zealand. For the three interview or non-intervention studies, African-Americans had a nonsignificantly lower overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (82.2% versus 83.5%; odds ratio [OR] ¼ 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–1.02). For these same three studies, Hispanics had a nonsignificantly higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (86.1% versus 83.5%; OR ¼ 1.37; 95% CI 0.94–1.98). For the ten clinical intervention studies, African-Americans’ overall consent rate was nonsignificantly higher than that of non-Hispanic whites (45.3% versus 41.8%; OR¼1.06; 95% CI 0.78–1.45). For these same ten studies, Hispanics had a statistically significant higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (55.9% versus 41.8%; OR¼1.33; 95% CI 1.08–1.65). For the seven surgery trials, which report all minority groups together, minorities as a group had a nonsignificantly higher overall consent rate than non-Hispanic whites (65.8% versus 47.8%; OR ¼ 1.26; 95% CI 0.89–1.77). Given the preponderance of US sites, the vast majority of these individuals from minority groups were African-Americans or Hispanics from the US. Conclusions We found very small differences in the willingness of minorities, most of whom were African-Americans and Hispanics in the US, to participate in health research compared to non-Hispanic whites. These findings, based on the research enrollment decisions of over 70,000 individuals, the vast majority from the US, suggest that racial and ethnic minorities in the US are as willing as non-Hispanic whites to participate in health research. Hence, efforts to increase minority participation in health research should focus on ensuring access to health research for all groups, rather than changing minority attitudes.


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    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Racial, Minorities, Health, Research, Willingness, Participation, Participate, trust, public health, methodology, Tuskegee Syphilis Study, distrust, medicine, ethics, ethical, ethnicity, socioeconomic, demographic, justice, social, underrepresented
    Subjects: Health > Health Equity > Bioethics
    Health > Public Health
    Practice > outreach
    Practice > interventions
    Practice > service
    Research
    Research > methodologies
    Related URLs:
    Depositing User: Users 24 not found.
    Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2011
    Last Modified: 21 Mar 2012 22:06
    Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/566

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