Minority Health Archive

Integrated connection to neighborhood storytelling network, education, and chronic disease knowledge among African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles.

Kim, Yong-Chan and Moran, Meghan B and Wilkin, Holley A and Ball-Rokeach, Sandra J (2011) Integrated connection to neighborhood storytelling network, education, and chronic disease knowledge among African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles. Journal of health communication, 16 (4). pp. 393-415. ISSN 1087-0415

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Abstract

Combining key ideas from the knowledge-gap hypothesis and communication infrastructure theory, the present study aimed to explain the relations among individuals' education, access to community-based communication resources, and knowledge of chronic diseases (diabetes, hypertension, breast cancer, and prostate cancer) among African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles. Rather than explore the effect of isolated communication resources, this study explored the effect of an integrated connection to community-based storytellers on chronic disease knowledge. The authors hypothesized that individuals' access to a community-based communication infrastructure for obtaining and sharing information functions as an intervening step in the process where social inequality factors such as education lead to chronic disease knowledge gaps in a local community context. With random samples of African Americans and Latinos in Los Angeles, the authors found that access to community-based communication resources plays a mediating role in the case of breast cancer and diabetes knowledge, but not in hypertension and prostate cancer knowledge. The authors discussed these findings on the basis of communication infrastructure theory and knowledge-gap hypothesis.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: knowledge-gap hypothesis, communication infrastructure theory, community-based communication resources, African Americans, Latinos, community-based storytellers, chronic disease
Subjects: Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases
Practice
Research > studies
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 18 Aug 2011 14:00
Last Modified: 18 Aug 2011 14:00
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/3100

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