Minority Health Archive

Racial residential segregation: a fundamental cause of racial disparities in health.

Williams, D R and Collins, C (2001) Racial residential segregation: a fundamental cause of racial disparities in health. Public Health Reports, 116 (5). pp. 404-416. ISSN 0033-3549

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Abstract

Racial residential segregation is a fundamental cause of racial disparities in health. The physical separation of the races by enforced residence in certain areas is an institutional mechanism of racism that was designed to protect whites from social interaction with blacks. Despite the absence of supportive legal statutes, the degree of residential segregation remains extremely high for most African Americans in the United States. The authors review evidence that suggests that segregation is a primary cause of racial differences in socioeconomic status (SES) by determining access to education and employment opportunities. SES in turn remains a fundamental cause of racial differences in health. Segregation also creates conditions inimical to health in the social and physical environment. The authors conclude that effective efforts to eliminate racial disparities in health must seriously confront segregation and its pervasive consequences.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: After clicking the link, scroll down the page to find the article. This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Racial residential segregation, disparities in health, institutional mechanism of racism, African Americans
Subjects: Health > Health Equity
Health > Disparities
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 09 Jul 2011 16:03
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2011 16:03
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/2686

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