Minority Health Archive

Attitudes about Racism, Medical Mistrust, and Satisfaction with Care among African American and White Cardiac Patients

LaVeist, Thomas A. and Nickerson, Kim J. and Bowie, Janice V. (2000) Attitudes about Racism, Medical Mistrust, and Satisfaction with Care among African American and White Cardiac Patients. Medical Care Research and Review, 57 (4). pp. 146-161. ISSN 10775587

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Abstract

The authors examine determinants of satisfaction with medical care among 1,784 (781 African American and 1,003 white) cardiac patients. Patient satisfaction was modeled as a function of predisposing factors (gender, age, medical mistrust, and perception of racism) and enabling factors (medical insurance). African Americans reported less satisfaction with care. Although both black and white patients tended not to endorse the existence of racism in the medical care system, African American patients were more likely to perceive racism. African American patients were significantly more likely to report mistrust. Multivariate analysis found that the perception of racism and mistrust of the medical care system led to less satisfaction with care. When perceived racism and medical mistrust were controlled, race was no longer a significant predictor of satisfaction.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Access to full text is subject to the publisher's access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: patient satisfaction, medical mistrust, racial attitudes, utilization of health care
Subjects: Health > Health Equity
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Cardiovascular Disease
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2011 12:18
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2011 12:18
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/2584

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