Minority Health Archive

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Osteoarthritis: Prevalence, Outcomes, and Medical Care

Dominick, Kelli L. and Baker, Tamara A. (2004) Racial and Ethnic Differences in Osteoarthritis: Prevalence, Outcomes, and Medical Care. Ethnicity & Disease, 14 (4). pp. 558-566.

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Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic condition and a leading cause of disability among older adults. Studies indicate there are important racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence of OA, as well as in the associated outcomes and medical care. In general, research suggests some minority groups, especially African-American and Hispanic individuals, may be at risk for poorer outcomes (such as pain and disability), and are less likely to undergo arthroplasty, compared to Caucasian Americans. Racial and ethnic differences in OA and its medical care are poorly understood. Research is needed to examine biological, psychosocial, and lifestyle factors that may contribute to these disparities.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: After clicking link, scroll down the page to find the article. Access to full text is subject to the publisher's access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Ethnic Groups; Osteoarthritis; Race
Subjects: Health > Disparities
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 07 Dec 2008
Last Modified: 23 Jun 2011 16:24
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/1185

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