Minority Health Archive

Twenty years after. The legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. The dangers of difference.

King, Patricia A. (1992) Twenty years after. The legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. The dangers of difference. Hastings Center Report, 22 (6). pp. 35-38.

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Abstract

It has been sixty years since the beginning of the Tuskegee syphilis experiment and twenty years since its existence was disclosed to the American public. The social and ethical issues that the experiment poses for medicine, particularly for medicine's relationship with African Americans, are still not broadly understood, appreciated, or even remembered.[1] Yet a significant aspect of the Tuskegee experiment's legacy is that in a racist society that incorporates beliefs about the inherent inferiority of African Americans in contrast with the superior status of whites, any attention to the question of differences that may exist is likely to be pursued in a manner that burdens rather than benefits African Americans.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Tuskegee syphilis experiment; African Americans; racist society
Subjects: Health > Health Equity > Bioethics
Health > Public Health
Research
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 10 Oct 2008
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2011 13:06
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/1096

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