Minority Health Archive

Is Lipid-Lowering Therapy Underused by African Americans at High Risk of Coronary Heart Disease Within the VA Health Care System?

Woodard, LeChauncy D. and Kressin, Nancy R. and Petersen, Laura A. (2004) Is Lipid-Lowering Therapy Underused by African Americans at High Risk of Coronary Heart Disease Within the VA Health Care System? American Journal of Public Health, 94 (12). pp. 2112-2117. ISSN 0090-0036

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Abstract

Objectives. We examined whether racial differences exist in cholesterol monitoring, use of lipid-lowering agents, and achievement of guideline-recommended lowdensity lipoprotein (LDL) levels for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Methods. We reviewed charts for 1045 African American and White patients with coronary heart disease at 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals. Results. Lipid levels were obtained in 67.0% of patients. Whites and African Americans had similar screening rates and mean lipid levels. Among the 544 ideal candidates for therapy, rates of treatment and achievement of target LDL levels were similar. Conclusions. We found no disparities in cholesterol management. This absence of disparities may be the result of VA quality improvement initiatives or prescription coverage through the VA health care system.


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Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available at the publisher’s Web site. Access to the full text is subject to the publisher’s access restrictions.
Uncontrolled Keywords: cholesterol monitoring; lowdensity lipoprotein; secondary prevention
Subjects: Health > Disparities
Health > Public Health > Chronic Illness & Diseases > Cardiovascular Disease
Research
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Depositing User: Users 141 not found.
Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2008
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2011 10:18
Link to this item (URI): http://health-equity.lib.umd.edu/id/eprint/1035

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